Latest News https://www.aims.gov.au/ en The world’s most advanced research aquarium facility receives a boost https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/worlds-most-advanced-research-aquarium-facility-receives-boost <h1 class="au-header-heading">The world’s most advanced research aquarium facility receives a boost</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Mon, 2020-11-23 13:33</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>The Australian Government is funding the expansion of the <a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/seasim">National Sea Simulator</a> at the Australian Institute of Marine Science as part of the <a href="https://www.education.gov.au/2020-21-budget-research-package">2020 Research Infrastructure Investment Plan</a>.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/node/3664">AIMS’ Chief Executive Officer Dr Paul Hardisty</a> said he was delighted the Government has made such a significant investment in AIMS’ high-quality, objective, independent, and transparent research in this year's budget.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“AIMS is a leader in coral reef science and has been developing new ground-breaking approaches to increase the resilience of coral reefs against growing pressures including climate change,” Dr Hardisty said.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“The National Sea Simulator, also known as SeaSim, is the world’s most advanced research aquarium facility. This investment supports its expansion and operation as a merit-based National Facility, maintaining Australia’s global expertise in coral reef research and enabling AIMS to continue to provide unique, irreplaceable and world-leading science.”</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The timing of the funding, $36.3 million over the next three years, will bring forward vital research including projects for the collaborative <a href="https://www.gbrrestoration.org/">Reef Restoration and Adaptation Program</a>.</span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="ec9538e8-8ced-4a88-91c9-c1548ff0c4b6" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/p1022295_1050px.jpg" width="1200" height="676" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>(L to R) Mr George Christensen MP, Member for Dawson, The Hon Karen Andrews MP and Dr Paul Hardisty, AIMS CEO</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span>Australia’s 'Blue Economy' is now worth over $80 billion per year and growing. The Great Barrier Reef alone provides over 66,000 permanent jobs and generates over $6 billion each year for our economy.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“The National Sea Simulator is critical national infrastructure and this investment will allow AIMS to continue to deliver positive environmental, social and economic impact for the nation,” he said.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The Hon Karen Andrews MP and Mr George Christensen MP, Member for Dawson visited the National Sea Simulator in Townsville today. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><a href="https://ministers.dese.gov.au/tehan/research-protect-and-preserve-great-barrier-reef">Read the media release</a> from The Hon Dan Tehan MP, The Hon Karen Andrews MP and Mr George Christensen.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5286/edit" hreflang="en">SeaSim with solar panels</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/seasim_with_solar_panels_2_1050px.jpg" width="1200" height="678" alt="SeaSim with solar panels" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Mon, 23 Nov 2020 02:33:47 +0000 kate 3765 at https://www.aims.gov.au Abundant corals and fishes emerge from the ancient contours of Arafura Marine Park https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/abundant-corals-and-fishes-emerge-ancient-contours-arafura-marine-park <h1 class="au-header-heading">Abundant corals and fishes emerge from the ancient contours of Arafura Marine Park</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-11-17 14:38</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span>Scientists have collected the first fine-scale maps and imagery of reefs and submarine canyons in the rarely visited <a href="https://parksaustralia.gov.au/marine/parks/north/arafura/">Arafura Marine Park</a>, revealing seafloor environments with surprisingly diverse coral and fish communities.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>The survey team from the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and <a href="https://www.ga.gov.au/">Geoscience Australia</a> returned to Darwin on the weekend after a two-week voyage on RV <em>Solander</em>. The voyage was supported by the <a href="https://www.nespmarine.edu.au/">Australian Government’s National Environmental Science Program Marine Biodiversity Hub</a>.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>AIMS Research Program Leader, <a data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="a51c7e7f-6180-438d-9710-1695cfc3cf7b" href="/node/3522">Dr Karen Miller</a>, said t</span></span><span><span>here were vast knowledge gaps in the northern marine bio-region and this new knowledge would enable Australia to better understand and protect the universal value of the environment.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><a id="_Hlk56169835" name="_Hlk56169835"><span><span>“Information from this research voyage will provide </span></span></a><span><span>critical baseline data</span></span><span><span> to guide the management and protection of the Arafura Marine Park and sea country,” Dr Miller said. “This in turn will contribute to </span></span><span><span>sustainable economic opportunities, </span></span><span><span>and provide for the enjoyment and benefit of this special environment for current and future generations.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="f17320fe-5f39-49c0-9374-e755ab6a5027" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/arafura_marine_park_survey_locations_credit_geoscience_australia_1200px.jpg" width="1200" height="897" alt="Arafura_surveylocations _credit_GeoscienceAustralia" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>Survey locations in the Arafura Marine Park. Credit: Geoscience Australia</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The survey focused on deep and shallow pockets of reef amid the park’s sediment plains. These reefs are where invertebrates such as sponges and corals can attach and form habitat for other marine life.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>In the north of the park, at the outer edge of Australia’s continental shelf, the scientists visited Pillar Bank, part of an ancient river system that began its transformation to ocean some 14,000 years ago. In the shallow, southern area of the park, they visited Money Shoal,<span><span> some </span></span><span>200 km north-east of Darwin.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Both areas were mapped in detail using multibeam sonar, covering a total area of 350 square kilometres. Guided by the new maps, scientists stationed baited cameras on the seafloor, towed a video camera behind the ship, and sampled the sediments to build inventories of marine life.</span></span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div alt="Arafura_MoneyShoal_3Dbathymetry_credit_GeoscienceAustralia" data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="aa18af68-c630-4258-a0f3-0540aeab57d2" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/money_shoal_3d_credit_geoscience_australia.jpg" width="1200" height="674" alt="Arafura_MoneyShoal_3Dbathymetry_credit_GeoscienceAustralia" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>A 3D bathymetry map of Money Shoal in Arafura Marine Park. Credit: Geoscience Australia</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span><span>“Before the survey we only had blurry images that hinted at Money Shoal and Pillar Bank,” said <a href="https://www.nespmarine.edu.au/contact/picard-kim">Kim Picard of Geoscience Australia</a>, who led the multibeam mapping. “Now we have maps at two to three metres resolution and can see so much more detail of the shape of the seabed, at depths to 200 m.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>“On Pillar Bank, for example</span><span>, we discovered unusual mounds that rise 40 m above the seabed and have deep scour holes around them, carved out by the strong tidal currents. The cloudy waters here made it </span><span>difficult to picture the sponges and other filter feeding invertebrate communities.”</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>In the clear and relatively shallow waters of Money Shoal, the team had a clear view of hard coral and sponge gardens and a diverse range of colourful coral reef fishes and sharks in water depths of ~15 to ~70 m. In the deeper plain areas surrounding Money Shoal, there are hints of a relict dune system, hosting unexpectedly diverse communities, and an ancient river system.</span></span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="c8c0a74f-e519-4fbe-8e18-2c99d85975ad" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/arafura_moneyshoal_greyreefsharks_credit_aims_1200px.jpg" width="1200" height="726" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>Grey Reef sharks were in abundance in some areas of Money Shoal in Arafura Marine Park. Image: AIMS</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span><span>Arafura Marine Park is the northern-most of the 58 Australian Marine Parks situated around Australia.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>The marine park is managed by Parks Australia and protects unique marine habitat while also providing multiple benefits to Traditional Owners, regional communities and the economy through permitted sustainable activities.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Indigenous people have been sustainably using and managing sea country in the Arafura Marine Park for tens of thousands of years with sea country valued for cultural identity, health and well-being.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>More information about Arafura Marine Park is available at: </span></span><span><a href="https://parksaustralia.gov.au/marine/parks/north/arafura/"><span>https://parksaustralia.gov.au/marine/parks/north/arafura/</span></a></span></span></span></span></p> <p><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-11/Media%20release_Arafura%20Marine%20Park%20Survey_AIMS_17November2020.pdf"><span><span><span><span><span>Download | 212KB</span></span></span></span></span></a></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Media contacts</span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>John Liston, AIMS Public Affairs: </span></span><span><a href="mailto:j.liston@aims.gov.au"><span>j.liston@aims.gov.au</span></a></span><span><span>; +61 407 102 684</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/2" hreflang="en">Latest releases</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>Media Release</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5283/edit" hreflang="en">arafura_moneyshoal_shallowcoralreef_credit_aims_1200px.png</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/arafura_moneyshoal_shallowcoralreef_credit_aims_1200px.png" width="1200" height="667" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Tue, 17 Nov 2020 03:38:27 +0000 kate 3763 at https://www.aims.gov.au New research alliance to strengthen Australian tropical marine science https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/new-research-alliance-strengthen-australian-tropical-marine-science <h1 class="au-header-heading">New research alliance to strengthen Australian tropical marine science</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Mon, 2020-11-16 10:18</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The University of Western Australia (UWA) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) have joined forces today to launch an exciting new initiative to develop the world’s best marine science leaders. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The <a href="mailto:AIMS@UWA">AIMS@UWA</a> Alliance is the next step in a long-standing collaboration between the two leading marine institutions. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>UWA Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Professor Tim Colmer said the <a href="mailto:AIMS@UWA">AIMS@UWA</a> Alliance built on successful past collaborations. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>“We’re looking forward to expanding our joint research and opportunities for research student training, to address research needs in our tropical marine areas,” Professor Colmer said.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The Alliance will focus on improving capability in tropical marine science, particularly by providing support for postgraduate students and early career researchers. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><a data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="3a5f89f8-d21d-4529-8b4c-a4db2858442f" href="/node/3664">AIMS CEO Dr Paul Hardisty</a> said AIMS was delighted to partner with UWA on such an important program.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>“The Alliance signals an ongoing and enduring commitment to develop the best marine science talent in the world, focused on issues of relevance and value to Western Australia and the planet’s ocean,” Dr Hardisty said.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="1321a00e-450c-4e85-802e-56b5a1419971" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/20201110_142905_1200px.jpg" width="1200" height="583" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>AIMS and UWA gather at the Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre to celebrate the new <a href="mailto:AIMS@UWA">AIMS@UWA</a> Alliance.</figcaption> </figure> <p>UWA Oceans Institute Director Associate Professor Julian Partridge said the alliance’s ambition was to have an internationally visible, highly regarded cohort of emergent leaders in tropical marine science working together under the <a href="mailto:AIMS@UWA">AIMS@UWA</a> banner to address major issues in tropical marine environments.</p> <p>“Research will emphasise applied science with impact, underpinned by fundamental environmental research,” Associate Professor Partridge said.</p> <p>The initial cohort of <a href="mailto:AIMS@UWA">AIMS@UWA</a> researchers includes 12 PhD students and four postdoctoral researchers, all co-supervised by AIMS and UWA academic staff. By offering joint supervision, the Alliance will allow these future leaders greater opportunities to learn, network, and collaborate.</p> <p><span><span><span><span>In the coming months, the Alliance anticipates offering new postdoctoral and PhD positions to address topical issues with modern methods, spanning marine molecular biology (including eDNA for marine monitoring), marine plastic mitigation, and machine learning applied to tropical marine data. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span>The <a href="mailto:AIMS@UWA">AIMS@UWA</a> Alliance build upon the successful <a href="mailto:AIMS@JCU">AIMS@JCU</a> collaboration, which </span></span><span><span><span><span>facilitates the sharing of research infrastructure in Townsville and provides enhanced opportunities for the training of postgraduate students in tropical marine sciences.</span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5278/edit" hreflang="en">Clerke Bommie Western Australia</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/clerkebommietop_1200px.jpg" width="1200" height="900" alt="reef top in western australia" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Sun, 15 Nov 2020 23:18:44 +0000 kate 3762 at https://www.aims.gov.au Coral spawning sows seeds of hope for reef recovery research https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/coral-spawning-sows-seeds-hope-reef-recovery-research <h1 class="au-header-heading">Coral spawning sows seeds of hope for reef recovery research </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Fri, 2020-11-13 16:52</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>Scientists at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) have turned nocturnal over the last week during the first Great Barrier Reef mass coral spawning of the year, to further develop a method of reef restoration called ‘coral seeding’.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Coral seeding refers to restoration methods aimed at introducing young corals onto a reef, to boost the number that will be surviving to maturity and thus aiding its recovery. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>One approach to coral seeding, and the one being investigated by the AIMS Keppel Island Project Team, <a href="https://gbrrestoration.org/program/seeding-enhanced-corals-from-existing-stock-by-settlement-of-larval-slicks-on-devices/">involves small, portable devices that young coral</a> attach to in aquaria. Just days after spawning in aquaria, young, swimming coral larvae find space to settle down on the device and develop into small coral polyps. Once the coral polyps are well established, the devices are placed or ‘sown’ onto reefs where the corals grow and spread onto the natural reef surface, potentially helping speed the recovery of reefs from damage such as cyclones and coral bleaching. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/our-people/dr-carly-randall">Dr Carly Randall</a>, <a id="_Hlk55550949" name="_Hlk55550949">restoration ecologist and science lead for the AIMS Keppel Island Coral Project</a>, said coral spawning is an important natural time of renewal for reefs, and understanding what happens to baby corals in the first days of their life is key to reef restoration methods aimed at boosting the natural recovery process.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“In the first week of a coral’s life, the tiny swimming coral larvae experience a ‘bottleneck’ in their survival. While billions of fertilised eggs are sent up into the sea, only a tiny fraction of the baby corals make it onto the reef surface and survive,” Dr Randall said.</span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="2db09036-1bc8-465a-8d10-a165e439d54c" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/seasim_spawning2020_kcip_randall2_1200px.jpg" width="1200" height="900" alt="Carly Randall at microscope" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>Dr Carly Randall observes the development of fertilised coral eggs during coral spawning in the National Sea Simulator in November 2020.</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span>“Our research is focused on understanding what factors drive this bottleneck, how they differ among reef sites and coral species, and testing methods to overcome this challenge and apply them in the future in our restoration efforts.”</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“We are also trialling several device designs that already show promise for coral seeding. By comparing growth and survival of the small corals among different designs and finding the winners, we aim to help boost the natural recovery process of reefs.” </span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="805c7349-07b7-4a6f-bc44-4f7d6f9cd6c3" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/device_1050px.jpg" width="1200" height="900" alt="settlement device for corals" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>An example of a coral settlement device used in coal seeding. Such devices could help scale up restoration efforts by increasing the number of small corals that survive to maturity</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span>Eighty-five corals from ten different species were collected from reefs around the Keppel Islands on the southern Great Barrier Reef in October. They were brought 700km north by sea on the RV Cape Ferguson to spawn in the AIMS National Sea Simulator, a sophisticated research aquarium facility at the AIMS HQ in Townsville. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>In early 2021, the team will bring the devices and attached corals back to different reef sites throughout the Keppel Islands and their survival will be monitored over the coming months. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The method of coral seeding is still in development, </span></span></span>however early testing shows it has potential to be scaled up to restore large areas of reef to help faster recovery after disturbances, as well as cost effective.</p> <p><span><span><span>“Coral seeding is just one of <a href="https://gbrrestoration.org/">a range of tools scientists are testing</a> for their potential to help the Great Barrier Reef recover from and adapt to the impacts of climate change,” Dr Randall said. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“The Great Barrier Reef is enormous - the size of a small country. As climate change marches on, it is imperative that we mitigate carbon dioxide emissions, continue to manage our reefs and test ways in which we can assist the reef over large areas, and that are affordable.” </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Dr Cathie Page, postdoctoral fellow in coral reef restoration said reefs of the Keppel Islands are an ideal natural laboratory for research.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“The Keppel Island reefs are a great example of Australia’s inshore reefs, meaning they are close to shore and are easily accessible by land or boat. The reefs are also wonderfully diverse and vibrant, and are in good condition, despite past damage,” Dr Page said.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“Reefs around the Keppel Islands suffered from severe coral bleaching in early 2020 due to a marine heatwave. Our surveys in October showed some coral mortality, however many corals had survived and recovered their colouration and some are ready to reproduce, a hopeful sign of resilience.”</span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="1d755817-0bc1-47ca-a4f0-b0288a38f59b" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/copyrightaims_creditmarieroman_kicp2020-40_1050px.jpg" width="1200" height="900" alt="diver with settlement tile" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>Dr Cathie Page diving at a reef at the Keppel Islands in October 2020.</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span>The Keppel Islands Coral Project is a five-year research project being conducted in partnership with the Woppaburra Traditional Owners.</span></span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span><span>Learn more about the Keppel Islands Coral Project</span></span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><em>News</em> - </span></span></span><a data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="d772df8a-6cfb-48f0-b338-2fd031c1740e" href="/node/3661">Sea country mapping kicks off two-way knowledge sharing in the Keppels</a><span><span><span> </span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5274/edit" hreflang="en">seasim_spawning2020_kcip_cpage.jpg</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/seasim_spawning2020_kcip_cpage.jpg" width="4032" height="3024" alt="spawning in seasim under red light" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Fri, 13 Nov 2020 05:52:07 +0000 kate 3761 at https://www.aims.gov.au Australian Institute of Marine Science Medal 2020 awarded https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/australian-institute-marine-science-medal-2020-awarded <h1 class="au-header-heading">Australian Institute of Marine Science Medal 2020 awarded</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Wed, 2020-11-11 16:57</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><strong><span><span>Passion and collegiate contribution to marine science underpin inaugural awarding of AIMS Medal </span></span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>A passion for marine biology, recognition of the contribution of colleagues and enduring contribution to excellence has seen marine biologist, <a data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="7ae3f779-c1f9-4ba8-8890-b368acc161e1" href="/node/3512">Dr Andrew Heyward</a>, awarded the inaugural Australian Institute of Marine Science Medal.</span></span></span></span></p> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="entity_reference:media_thumbnail" data-entity-embed-display-settings="450_x_450" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="a09d342c-d7cd-4c0c-a736-e8fafa10d917" class="align-right embedded-entity" data-langcode="en"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/450_x_450/public/2020-11/20201111_114117_edited_600px.jpg?itok=EAm_CyYs" width="450" height="545" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <p><span><span><span><span>Pioneering the establishment of AIMS in Western Australia almost two decades ago, Dr Heyward was presented with the medal by AIMS’ Research Program Leader in Perth, <a data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="a51c7e7f-6180-438d-9710-1695cfc3cf7b" href="/node/3522">Dr Karen Miller</a>.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>The AIMS Medal will be awarded every two years in recognition of outstanding and enduring contribution to AIMS’s mission, commitment to sustained excellence, and exemplification of AIMS values.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><a data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="3a5f89f8-d21d-4529-8b4c-a4db2858442f" href="/node/3664"><span><span>AIMS CEO</span></span><span><span> Dr </span></span><span><span>Paul </span></span></a><span><span><a data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="3a5f89f8-d21d-4529-8b4c-a4db2858442f" href="/node/3664">Hardisty</a>, speaking via video link from Townsville, said </span></span><span><span>Dr Heyward was selected by a panel of his science peers from a list of highly credentialled colleagues</span></span><span><span>. The panel singled out his selflessness and considered leadership which</span></span><span><span> made a real difference to AIMS and enhanced the value of the science that AIMS delivers to the nation.  </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>“Andrew is a visionary science leader. More than a decade ago his pioneering published work on reef restoration and larval survival set the stage for our current major effort on the <a href="https://gbrrestoration.org/">Reef Restoration and Adaption Program. </a></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>“As AIMS’s work with industry grew, in no small way because of his efforts, Andrew led the enhancement of AIMS's safety performance and record into a new era of much stronger safety values and performance. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>“He was responsible for building relationships that endure over decades, as well as leading the development of key partnerships with the oil and gas industry which led to dozens of projects and a huge science impact, and established AIMS in the west as a viable long-term operation.” </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Dr Heyward described his work as a passion and a pleasure and paid tribute to his colleagues.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>“The award reflects an ongoing contribution to our values and our mission and you cannot do that on your own. Every time the best achievements that I have been involved in have been dependent on everyone else at AIMS. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>“The Australian Institute of Marine Science has a really worthy mission and has fantastic values, so what’s not to love,” he said.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Dr Hardisty said that Dr Heyward’s attitude, willingness to help, and positive outlook touched all who were lucky enough to work with him and that he could not think of a more deserving winner.</span></span></span></span><br />  </p> <figure role="group"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="140bc5f6-627e-41ec-99f5-0e926a877605" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-oembed-video field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item"> <iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/KaS6bvCnBKc&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=3Gjl1Le5o7U3vZhZPppkK_S_EsJMVnHy3N18Pk3dA3U" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="480" height="270" class="media-oembed-content" title="Inaugural Australian Institute of Marine Science Medal awarded to Dr Andrew Heyward"></iframe></div> </article> </div> <figcaption>Dr Andrew Heyward was awarded the inaugural Australian Institute of Marine Science medal in November, 2020.</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span><span>Dr Heyward completed his studies at James Cook University in Queensland, after which he held positions in Japan, Victoria and South Australia. He joined AIMS in 1994 as Scientist in Charge and established its first WA office in Dampier. Around 2001 both the AIMS office and Andrew relocated to Perth.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>His current research is focused on exploratory surveys of coastal and offshore habitats in north-west Australia and studies of coral biology related to early life histories. The work is revealing the globally significant diversity of benthic marine habitats in the north-west and Timor Sea. Added to this is reef restoration research which is exploring new ways to assess coral recruitment and enhance post-settlement survival.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span>“Being custodians of our planet is more important than ever and marine sciences can make a good contribution to the care of the oceans and our future,” he said.</span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/20201111_114117_edited4x3.jpg" width="800" height="600" alt="Dr Andrew Heyward AIMS medal" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Wed, 11 Nov 2020 05:57:55 +0000 kate 3760 at https://www.aims.gov.au Gene editing study finds gene for heat tolerance in corals https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/gene-editing-study-finds-gene-heat-tolerance-corals <h1 class="au-header-heading">Gene editing study finds gene for heat tolerance in corals</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-11-10 18:51</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><em>Scientists have used CRISPR-Cas technology to identify a gene responsible for heat tolerance in a coral on the Great Barrier Reef</em></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>An international research project has used gene-editing technology to examine the heat tolerance of Great Barrier Reef coral with the results set to guide efforts in combatting the effects of climate change.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The study <a href="https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/11/04/1920779117">published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)</a> involving researchers from Stanford University, the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), and Queensland University of Technology (QUT), used the CRISPR-Cas9 technique to make precise, targeted changes to the genome of coral.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Using this new technique, the research team demonstrated the importance of a particular gene on heat tolerance in the coral <em>Acropora millepora</em>.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Lead author Dr Philip Cleves, Principal Investigator at the Carnegie Institute for Science –Department of Embryology (formerly of Stanford University), developed new genetic methods to study corals and their response to climate change while undertaking postdoctoral research with Professor Pringle at Stanford University and colleagues in Australia.</span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div alt="Dr. Phillip Cleves of Carnegie Institute for Science microinjecting CRISPR-Cas9 reagents to make genomic edits in coral embryos (Acropora millepora)" data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="132be752-b0e3-4d54-bfdf-8bce18f5cb46" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/copyrightaims_creditmarieroman_philipcleves_crispr1.jpg" width="1296" height="864" alt="Dr. Phillip Cleves of Carnegie Institute for Science microinjecting CRISPR-Cas9 reagents to make genomic edits in coral embryos (Acropora millepora)" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>Dr. Phillip Cleves of Carnegie Institute for Science microinjecting CRISPR-Cas9 reagents to make genomic edits in coral embryos (Acropora millepora) at AIMS. Image: M. Roman/AIMS</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span>“We developed an improved CRISPR-Cas9 method that allowed us to test gene function in coral for the first time.” Dr Cleves said.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><em>“</em>As a proof-of-concept, we used CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to understand the function of a key gene that influences the ability of coral to survive heat.” </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>AIMS Principal Research Scientist and head of the Reef Recovery, Restoration and Adaptation Team <a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/our-people/dr-line-bay">Dr Line Bay</a> said that the emergence in the past decade of CRISPR-Cas9 provided a powerful tool to study the genes that influence heat and bleaching tolerance in corals.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“Understanding the genetic traits of heat tolerance of corals holds the key to understanding not only how corals will respond to climate change naturally but also balancing the benefits, opportunities and risks of novel management tools such as selective breeding and movement of corals among reefs,” she said. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>CRISPR-Cas9 acts like a pair of genetic scissors, allowing scientists to make precise changes to the DNA of an organism which allows them to either turn off a target gene or replace it with another piece of DNA. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>In this study, the researchers used CRISPR-Cas9 to turn off the Heat Shock Transcription Factor 1 gene (HSF1), which plays a crucial role in the heat response in many other organisms.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The modified larvae survived well in water with a temperature of 27 degrees Celsius but died rapidly when the water temperature was increased to 34 degrees. In contrast, the unmodified larvae survived well in the warmer water.</span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div alt="A colony of Acropora millepora on the Great Barrier Reef" data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="42b4f8c1-e2ae-4f92-a8bf-6f4ff23551ff" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/martins1s2_216_1050px.jpg" width="1200" height="900" alt="A colony of Acropora millepora on the Great Barrier Reef" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>A colony of Acropora millepora on the Great Barrier Reef</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span>Dr Dimitri Perrin, a chief investigator with the QUT Centre for Data Science, said the use of CRISPR technology in this study had enabled an increased understanding on the fundamental biology of corals.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“By removing the gene, and then exposing the coral larvae to heat stress, we demonstrated that the modified coral larvae died whereas the unmodified larvae were unharmed under the increased temperature,” Dr Perrin said.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“This result shows the key role HSF1 plays in coral coping with rising temperatures.”</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The researchers said they were are excited for this technological advance as it paved the way towards new genetic tools and knowledge for coral which would support their management and conservation in the future.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The scientists who discovered the CRISPR-Cas 9 technique recently received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry.</span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-11/Media%20Release_CRISPR%20in%20corals_AIMS_QUT_10November2020.pdf"><span><span><span>Media release | 271KB</span></span></span></a></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Media contact</strong></p> <p>Kate Green, Senior Communication Officer: <a href="mailto:k.green@aims.gov.au">k.green@aims.gov.au</a>; +61 419 741 724 (timezone is UTC + 10)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/2" hreflang="en">Latest releases</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>Media Release</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5263/edit" hreflang="en">Microinjection of CRISPR-Cas9 reagents in fertilised coral (Acropora millepora) eggs. P Cleves</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/microinjection_of_fertilised_a_millepora_eggs.jpg" width="1300" height="867" alt="Microinjection of CRISPR-Cas9 reagents in fertilised coral (Acropora millepora) eggs" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Tue, 10 Nov 2020 07:51:33 +0000 kate 3759 at https://www.aims.gov.au MoU strengthens science collaboration https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/mou-strengthens-science-collaboration <h1 class="au-header-heading">MoU strengthens science collaboration</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Fri, 2020-10-30 17:38</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The Australian Institute of Marine Science and Curtin University have this week signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to facilitate cooperation and collaboration in marine science research.</p> <p>This agreement, with one of Australia’s leading universities, is part of AIMS’ broader collaboration across the research and industry sectors to deliver outcomes that protect our oceans and drive the development of our blue economy.</p> <p>As well as guiding both AIMS and Curtin University in growing the research capacity in WA, the MoU will facilitate the sharing of facilities, resources and expertise, co-fund postdoctoral research fellowships and appointments and support students through joint supervision and scholarship partnering.</p> <p>AIMS’ Research Program Leader in WA, Dr Karen Miller, signed the MoU at Curtin University with Deputy Vice-Chancellor – Research Professor Chris Moran. AIMS CEO, Dr Paul Hardisty, attended via videoconference from Canberra.</p> <figure role="group"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="2ee62836-45bd-47f2-b67e-ac8154f7b6a7" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-10/20201027_135350_edited_800px.jpg" width="800" height="518" alt="AIMS and Curtin MoU signing" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>Curtin University Deputy Vice-Chancellor – Research Professor Chris Moran (left) with AIMS CEO Dr Paul Hardisty (center) and AIMS’ Research Program Leader in WA, Dr Karen Miller.</figcaption> </figure> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-10/20201027_135350_edited_800px.jpg" width="800" height="518" alt="AIMS and Curtin MoU signing" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Fri, 30 Oct 2020 06:38:59 +0000 kate 3754 at https://www.aims.gov.au The future is now: long-term research shows ocean acidification ramping up on the Reef https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/future-now-long-term-research-shows-ocean-acidification-ramping-reef <h1 class="au-header-heading">The future is now: long-term research shows ocean acidification ramping up on the Reef</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Wed, 2020-10-28 18:02</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">Ocean acidification is no longer a sombre forecast for the Great Barrier Reef but a present-day reality, a new study reveals.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">The study, </span><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-75293-1"><span>published in the international Journal <em>Scientific Reports</em>,</span></a><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"> shows carbon dioxide (CO<sub>2</sub>) and ocean acidification are rapidly increasing on the Reef. Seawater CO<sub>2</sub><span> </span>has risen 6 per cent over the past 10 years and matches the rate of CO<sub>2 </sub>increases in the atmosphere, confirming the influence of atmospheric CO<sub>2 </sub>on seawater CO<sub>2 </sub>levels.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">“People talk about ocean acidification in terms of 50 years’ time, but for the first time our study shows how fast ocean acidification is already happening on the Reef,” said </span><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/our-people/dr-katharina-fabricius"><span>Dr Katharina Fabricius</span></a><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">, lead author and Senior Principal Research Scientist at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS).</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">The research, a collaboration between AIMS and CSIRO, drew on over a decade of observations collected as part of Australia’s </span><a href="http://www.imos.org.au"><span>Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS)</span></a><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"> to conclude that the Reef’s rich carbonate seafloor is not buffering against ocean acidification as previously thought.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span>“Our research shows that acidification is rapidly changing the conditions that support the growth of coral on the Reef. It’s never been more important to address ocean acidification in plans to manage the Reef”, said Dr. Bronte Tilbrook, a Senior Principal Research Scientist at CSIRO who leads </span></span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">IMOS’ <span>observational projects for CO</span><sub>2</sub><span> and ocean acidification. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <figure role="group"> <div alt="The Yongala National Reference Station on the central Great Barrier Reef with the AIMS research vessel Cape Ferguson" data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="entity_reference:media_thumbnail" data-entity-embed-display-settings="landscape" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="311da6cf-1616-46be-a95c-086a3765a286" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/landscape/public/2020-10/yongala_real_time_deployment_2_copyright_aims.jpg?h=84071268&amp;itok=Ey3A24uv" width="600" height="337" alt="The Yongala National Reference Station on the central Great Barrier Reef with the AIMS research vessel Cape Ferguson" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <figcaption>The Yongala National Reference Station on the central Great Barrier Reef, one of the long-term monitoring stations on the Great Barrier Reef with the AIMS research vessel Cape Ferguson</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">Ocean acidification results from seawater absorbing excess CO<sub>2</sub> <span>that has been emitted into </span>the atmosphere. The CO<sub>2</sub> dissolves in the seawater where it changes the chemistry. This includes decreasing the water’s pH, and reducing the aragonite saturation state, which is critical for building the skeletons of reef-building coral and other marine organisms.  Under reduced pH conditions, their calcium carbonate skeletons take longer to form and weaken, leaving them more susceptible to damage and erosion.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">While long-term data exist for CO<sub>2</sub> and ocean acidification trends in open oceans, there have been very few long-term data on these trends in coastal waters around the world, including the Great Barrier Reef. Biological and physical processes like respiration create large fluctuations in CO<sub>2 </sub>in coastal areas, making the detection of trends more difficult.  </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">The study has filled this important knowledge gap by analysing 10 years of CO<sub>2</sub>, pH and aragonite saturation state data (2009–2019). These data were collected as part of Australia’s IMOS<span class="MsoHyperlink"> network at </span>two long-term monitoring stations, located 650 kilometres apart at contrasting locations.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">The researchers found the minimum CO<sub>2</sub> concentrations measured today were likely to already have passed the highest CO<sub>2 </sub>levels expected 60 years ago, even after accounting for the effects of temperature, nutrients, salinity, and daily and seasonal changes. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span>“We know now that oceans are taking up about 23% of the excess </span></span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">CO<sub>2</sub> <span>from the air. They actually provide a service to humanity by slowing climate change. But the price to pay is that the seawater’s carbon chemistry is changing, and we didn't know it was happening in dynamic coastal waters at such fast rates,” Dr Fabricius said.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">In another research first, AIMS and CSIRO scientists have used data from 1384 Reef sites to show coastal acidification’s negative impacts on three important indicators of Reef health: </span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">the numbers of both baby coral and coralline algae are plummeting as CO<sub>2</sub> increases across the Reef, and </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">undesirable seaweed is thriving at high CO<sub>2</sub> locations. </span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">The study, published earlier this year in the </span><a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/gcb.14985"><span>journal<em> Global Change Biology</em></span></a><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN">, found these baby coral and coralline algae also decreased and seaweed increased as fine suspended sediment increased across the Reef — with the greatest sediment concentration and organism changes observed closer to the shore. The researchers highlighted effective water quality management as an achievable solution to reduce coastal acidification’s impact on the Reef.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><em><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span><span>Australia’s Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) is enabled by the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). It is operated by a consortium of institutions as an unincorporated joint venture, with the University of Tasmania as Lead Agent.</span></span></span></em></span></span></span></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/2020-10/Media%20release_AIMS_CSIRO_Ocean%20acidfication%20on%20the%20Great%20Barrier%20Reef_Oct28.pdf">Media release | 201KB</a></p> <p><strong><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span><span>Media contacts</span></span></span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span><span>Kate Green, Senior Communication Officer: <a href="mailto:k.green@aims.gov.au">k.green@aims.gov.au</a>; +61 419 741 724 (timezone is UTC + 10)</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span lang="EN" xml:lang="EN" xml:lang="EN"><span><span>Fiona Brown, CSIRO Communication Advisor: <a href="mailto:fiona.brown@csiro.au">fiona.brown@csiro.au</a>; +61 403 509 864 (timezone is UTC +11)</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/2" hreflang="en">Latest releases</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>Media Release</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5239/edit" hreflang="en">Corals at Palm Island</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-10/corals_at_palm_island_176_copyright_aims.jpg" width="2000" height="1333" alt="Corals at Palm Island" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Wed, 28 Oct 2020 07:02:26 +0000 kate 3753 at https://www.aims.gov.au New marine science leader appointed to Western Australia https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/new-marine-science-leader-appointed-western-australia <h1 class="au-header-heading">New marine science leader appointed to Western Australia</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-09-22 15:07</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><figure role="group" class="align-right"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="fd774ac4-013b-4f54-b151-dd7a836e2f18" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-01/miller_karen_2017_300px_profile.jpg" width="300" height="300" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>Dr Karen Miller, AIMS' new Research Program<br /> Director</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span>The nation’s tropical marine research agency, the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), announced the appointment of <a data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="a51c7e7f-6180-438d-9710-1695cfc3cf7b" href="/node/3522">Dr Karen Miller</a> as Research Program Director in Western Australia.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Dr Miller, who has been acting in the role since December 2019, also leads AIMS’ Perth facility at the Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre in Crawley. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>She will strengthen and diversify relationships with industry, regulators, and research partners to deliver science impact across the economic, social and environmental domains and continue AIMS’ close collaboration with industry partners to identify relevant knowledge gaps in marine ecosystems.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Prior to her appointment Dr Miller was a Principal Research Scientist at AIMS and the Team Leader for the agency’s Ecological and Biological Monitoring in WA. </span></span></p> <p><span><span><a data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="3a5f89f8-d21d-4529-8b4c-a4db2858442f" href="/node/3664">AIMS Chief Executive Officer Dr Paul Hardisty</a> congratulated Dr Miller on her appointment and her commitment to marine science excellence.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“The search for a science leader in WA was both very extensive and highly competitive and I am pleased that Karen’s appointment reflects the depth of internal leadership talent within AIMS.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“Karen is a proven and engaging leader who nine months ago stepped forward to guide AIMS’ west coast operations through an interim transition. In confirming this appointment, AIMS in Western Australia will continue to provide the research and knowledge necessary to support the sustainable economic growth of marine ecosystems in WA’s north-west,” he said.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Dr Miller began her scientific career studying coral reefs on the Great Barrier Reef and has since worked throughout Australia, as well as in Antarctica. She started at AIMS as a Senior Research Scientist in 2014. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Her most recent research focuses was on understanding the patterns and processes driving the distribution of benthic biodiversity across Australia's North West Shelf. She holds a PhD from James Cook University in Townsville, Queensland.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Dr Miller said that AIMS has worked closely with industries in north-western Australia for decades to provide the scientific knowledge and data to ensure sustainable development in the region.  </span></span></p> <p><span><span>“Marine based industries are paramount to WA’s economy – they create jobs and increase national prosperity and I am excited about the opportunity to lead AIMS WA Science to ensure future generations can continue to benefit from our oceans,” she said.</span></span></p> <p><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-09/Release%20-%20New%20marine%20science%20leader%20appointed%20to%20Western%20Australia.pdf">PDF | 416KB</a></p> <p><strong>Media contact</strong></p> <p>John Liston, AIMS Public Affairs: <a href="mailto:media@aims.gov.au">media@aims.gov.au</a>; +61 407 102 684 (time zone is UTC +8)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/2" hreflang="en">Latest releases</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>Media Release</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-09/0f8a7451_karen_miller_2017_800px.jpg" width="800" height="533" alt="Portrait photo of scientist with glasses and science texts" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Tue, 22 Sep 2020 05:07:22 +0000 kate 3744 at https://www.aims.gov.au Mystery pufferfish circles discovered in Australia's north-west https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/mystery-pufferfish-circles-discovered-australias-north-west <h1 class="au-header-heading">Mystery pufferfish circles discovered in Australia&#039;s north-west</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Thu, 2020-09-17 15:44</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Mystery circles providing evidence of a potential new species of pufferfish have been discovered in Australia’s north-west by researchers at The University of Western Australia and Australian Institute of Marine Science.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The </span></span><a href="https://aus01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fonlinelibrary.wiley.com%2Fdoi%2Fabs%2F10.1111%2Fjfb.14506%3Faf%3DR&amp;data=02%7C01%7Canna-lee.harry%40uwa.edu.au%7C84c01216133e49c117b908d847bcdb3f%7C05894af0cb2846d8871674cdb46e2226%7C1%7C0%7C637338223742862811&amp;sdata=jkCLy8oF3bwrFzIuwnC%2FcF7O7%2FTiDNYVPHPSNAy8Mek%3D&amp;reserved=0"><span>research</span></a><span><span>, published in the <em>Journal of Fish Biology</em>, placed the discovery at more than 5500km away from the only other similarly described structures off Amami-Oshima Island in southern Japan.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The discovery was made on the North West Shelf of Western Australia when 22 mystery circles were spotted on video footage collected by Fugro during an inspection of the Echo Yodel subsea infrastructure – operated by Woodside on behalf of the North West Shelf Project participants – and while surveying fish along the ancient coastline.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The circles, which are the first to be found in Australia, were recognised by the researchers as the complex underwater structures created by the white-spotted pufferfish previously thought to be found only in southern Japan.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Most notably the size, number of ridges and presence of an intricate central circle with two outer rings makes them comparable to those found in Japanese waters.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Originally found at depths of less than 30m in Japan, the finding in the north-west extends their depth occurrence to 137m.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Sightings of pufferfish were captured in the immediate vicinity of the circles, near the subsea infrastructure, from Woodside footage using a remotely operated vehicle and an autonomous underwater vehicle, although further investigation was needed to classify the species.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Lead author Todd Bond from UWA’s Oceans Institute and School of Biological Sciences said the discovery of the unique circle structures were most likely produced by a male pufferfish species to use as a nest.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>“The pufferfish species responsible cannot be identified from the images collected but it is possibly a new species,” Mr Bond said.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Not only does this discovery spark intrigue and wonder among scientists and the general public, it also provides an insight into the reproductive behaviour and evolution of pufferfish globally.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Matthew Birt from AIMS said the discovery showed the importance of working alongside industry to uncover the wealth of information so far undiscovered.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span> <span><span>“Industry routinely conduct video surveys of their assets which are often located in deep and remote waters,” Mr Birt said.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>“So it’s great that operators of oil and gas infrastructure share their video imagery to build on our existing scientific knowledge.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>“We can now focus on mapping the distribution of these elaborate pufferfish structures and plan scientific expeditions to collect biological samples so that we can identify and classify the fish.”</span></span></span></span></span></span><br />  </p> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="a667a6f7-3dc2-4fd5-b13a-8889944acbf7" class="align-center embedded-entity" data-langcode="en"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-oembed-video field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item"> <iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/FAIT-WWpDN4&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=jiZbDKo6UFWF3KSGfxczH7VFyNxaHvvedaNiQdLq6-A" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="480" height="270" class="media-oembed-content" title="Mystery pufferfish circles discovered in Australia’s north-west"></iframe></div> </article> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5218/edit" hreflang="en">Pufferfish circles_UWA</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-09/_ad_eyumb_auv_puffer_circles_23.606.jpg" width="723" height="579" alt="circular pattern on the seafloor" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Thu, 17 Sep 2020 05:44:46 +0000 kate 3745 at https://www.aims.gov.au