Latest News https://www.aims.gov.au/ en Southern reefs survive the hot summer of 2020 https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/southern-reefs-survive-hot-summer-2020 <h1 class="au-header-heading">Southern reefs survive the hot summer of 2020</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/38" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">m.knapton</span></span> <span>Tue, 2021-03-02 15:42</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Surveys from the AIMS Long Term Monitoring Program have returned good news from the southern  Great Barrier Reef, showing offshore reefs suffered little impact from moderate bleaching during the 2019-20 mass coral bleaching event.   </p> <p>AIMS are closely monitoring the recovery of the reefs, spanning over 490 reefs within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.  </p> <p>While the 2019-2020 mass coral bleaching event was the third event in five years, it was the first time such widespread, severe bleaching has occurred in the southern region. </p> <p>The recovery was observed on six reefs not experiencing crown-of-thorns outbreaks – making the reefs the perfect candidates for scientists to observe their recovery closely. </p> <p>Dive into our <a href="https://arcg.is/0vv1i">interactive story map</a> to learn more about the recovery of the southern reefs.   </p> <p>AIMS’ long term monitoring program has regularly monitored reefs along the Great Barrier Reef for more than 30 years.   </p> <p>The team will be continuing in-water surveys on the mid-shelf and outer reefs until April. Reports from each survey trip are available on our website.  </p> <p><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/southern-reefs-recover-bleaching">Read our media release of the Southern recovery.</a></p> <p> </p> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="entity_reference:media_thumbnail" data-entity-embed-display-settings="landscape" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="3d61e9e1-7280-4bc8-9fa6-4f2869bfce44" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/landscape/public/2021-03/copyright_aims_southern_great_barrier_reef-2.jpg?h=4521fff0&amp;itok=bx2OYbfL" width="600" height="337" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-03/copyright_aims_aims_scientist_monitoring_coral_at_broomfield_reef-2.jpg" width="2048" height="1365" alt="AIMS team monitoring southern reefs" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Tue, 02 Mar 2021 04:42:46 +0000 m.knapton 3814 at https://www.aims.gov.au Southern reefs recover from bleaching https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/southern-reefs-recover-bleaching <h1 class="au-header-heading">Southern reefs recover from bleaching</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/38" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">m.knapton</span></span> <span>Tue, 2021-03-02 15:25</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="entity_reference:media_thumbnail" data-entity-embed-display-settings="featured" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="a8ad6997-2ae0-4fa2-86c5-e6f268297bb1" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured/public/2021-03/copyright_aims_aims_scientist_monitoring_coral_at_broomfield_reef-2.jpg?itok=GGqF10yH" width="1200" height="800" alt="AIMS team monitoring southern reefs" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <p>Under the right conditions, corals can recover from bleaching events.</p> <p>This is the case for multiple reefs in the southern Great Barrier Reef, which avoided wide-spread mortality from the 2020 mass coral bleaching event.</p> <p>These reefs escaped prolonged heat stress and did not have ongoing impacts from crown-of-thorns starfish – giving the corals a chance to bounce back from bleaching.</p> <p>Australian Institute of Marine Science’s (AIMS) monitoring program team leader Dr Mike Emslie said the six reefs, spanning offshore between Shoalwater Bay and Agnes Waters, were observed closely by scientists because of their specific disturbance history.</p> <p>“These reefs were the perfect candidates for our team to observe their recovery – the corals were not severely bleached and did not have extra stress from the coral eating starfish,” he said.</p> <p>“What is often misunderstood is corals do not immediately die from bleaching – bleaching is a stress response, and they can recover if given the opportunity.</p> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="entity_reference:media_thumbnail" data-entity-embed-display-settings="large" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="3d61e9e1-7280-4bc8-9fa6-4f2869bfce44" class="align-right embedded-entity" data-langcode="en"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2021-03/copyright_aims_southern_great_barrier_reef-2.jpg?itok=nJK7_LNE" width="480" height="360" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <p>“Our preliminary results show these reefs appear to have had little impact from the 2020 mass coral bleaching, with  an increase of hard coral cover at most reefs.</p> <p>“This increase is what we predict in the absence of disturbance. The reefs were given the opportunity to recover because 75% of southern reefs were not exposed to sustained temperatures expected to cause mortality and were also free the from the additional stressors of crown-of-thorns starfish.”</p> <p>Research Program Director Dr Britta Schaffelke said disturbances, such as crown-of-thorns starfish, can be significant in hindering the recovery process of reefs following bleaching events.</p> <p>“AIMS scientists lead world-class research in this effort to understand cumulative impacts on coral reefs,” she said.<br /> While the 2019-2020 mass coral bleaching event was the third event in five years, it was the first time such  widespread bleaching has occurred in the southern region.</p> <p>“These results are encouraging for the southern region –  but we are still in the water conducting surveys all along   the Great Barrier Reef to understand the full impact of the 2020 mass bleaching event, and indeed other disturbances, for both coral mortality and recovery,” said Dr Emslie.</p> <p> </p> <p>Media Contact: <a href="mailto:media@aims.gov.au">media@aims.gov.au</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/2" hreflang="en">Latest releases</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>Media Release</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-03/copyright_aims_aims_scientist_monitoring_coral_at_broomfield_reef-2.jpg" width="2048" height="1365" alt="AIMS team monitoring southern reefs" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Tue, 02 Mar 2021 04:25:54 +0000 m.knapton 3813 at https://www.aims.gov.au West coast reefs warming up https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/west-coast-reefs-warming <h1 class="au-header-heading">West coast reefs warming up</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/38" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">m.knapton</span></span> <span>Tue, 2021-02-16 14:55</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>Scientists are keeping a close eye on reefs along the west coast of Australia, with sea surface temperatures reaching levels where some coral bleaching is occurring.  </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The thermal stress has been accumulating over the high-risk summer period and is expected to continue until April, according to forecasts from the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM).  </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Australian Institute of Marine Science’s (AIMS) coral ecologist Dr James Gilmour said the areas of concern include reefs in the Pilbara, Ningaloo, Shark Bay and the Abrolhos. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“Low level bleaching has already been observed in parts of Exmouth Gulf and in the Dampier Archipelago, which were reported by officers from the Department of Biodiversity Conservation and Attractions (DBCA),” he said. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span> “While cloud cover and rainfall from a recent tropical low has reduced some heat stress, the risk of bleaching will continue in the coming weeks in central to southern Western Australian reefs.” </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The recurring threat of bleaching to WA coral reefs has galvanised collaborative efforts across government and research institutions, drawing on the most current observations and forecasts based on data provided by BoM, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), CSIRO, the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) and the University of Western Australia (UWA). </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“In the coming weeks, we’ll have many eyes on the reef to report coral bleaching and in-water surveys will be conducted by several research agencies, including AIMS, DBCA and CSIRO,” Dr Gilmour said. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“This week we are conducting in-water surveys around Ningaloo – this monitoring will extend to other reefs at risk in the coming weeks.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“We are encouraging people who are visiting these reefs to download our app ArcGIS Collector and report any sightings of coral bleaching.” </span></span></span><span><span><span> </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Currently, on the other side of Australia, temperatures are below bleaching thresholds for the most part of the Great Barrier Reef. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The 2020-2021 summer has been characterised by a La Niña event, which is forecasted by BoM to last until Autumn.  </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>This climate driver has meant above average rainfall has been likely for eastern and some northern parts of Australia, meaning a lower risk of bleaching in the Kimberley and the Great Barrier Reef.  </span></span></span></p> <p><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/sites/default/files/2021-02/west_coast_reefs_warming_up_media_release_16_feb_2021_wa.pdf">Download media release</a></p> <p><strong>Media Contact</strong></p> <p>Molly Knapton, AIMS Communication Officer: <a href="mailto:m.knapton@aims.gov.au">m.knapton@aims.gov.au</a></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/2" hreflang="en">Latest releases</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>Media Release</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/withnell_bay_photo_credit_suzie_glac.jpg" width="1536" height="2048" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Tue, 16 Feb 2021 03:55:53 +0000 m.knapton 3809 at https://www.aims.gov.au Inshore water quality monitoring recommences in the Fitzroy region https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/inshore-water-quality-monitoring-recommences-fitzroy-region <h1 class="au-header-heading">Inshore water quality monitoring recommences in the Fitzroy region </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Fri, 2021-02-12 15:12</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>The AIMS water quality team have recommenced field sampling in the coastal waters of the Fitzroy region in the southern Great Barrier Reef, in partnership with the <a href="https://www.barrierreef.org/">Great Barrier Reef Foundation</a><span class="MsoHyperlink"><u>.</u></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The Fitzroy Basin Marine Monitoring Program for Inshore Water Quality will provide valuable information on the condition and trend of water quality in the high-priority area.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/our-people/dr-renee-k-gruber">AIMS oceanographer Dr Renee Gruber</a> said given the Fitzroy was the largest basin on Australia’s east coast, the Program was important to understanding the whole story of water quality on the Great Barrier Reef.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“AIMS has monitored water quality on the inshore Great Barrier Reef for 15 years. We measure regularly and over long periods of time to understand the short and long-term changes in coastal waters.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“Our water quality team will monitor several sites between the Fitzroy River mouth and North Keppel Island to track the condition and trend of inshore water quality. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“The team will collect water samples, as well as use a network of underwater loggers to measure sediment and nutrients in coastal waters and other important factors such as water clarity to understand the conditions experienced by seagrasses and corals in the area.”</span></span></span></p> <figure role="group" class="align-center"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="5d5e7131-9e2e-4dc1-9bfa-5558ce57618f" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/20210203_115026_800px.jpg" width="800" height="600" alt="Instrument technician preparing Fitzroy mooring on ship" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>Oceanographic instrument technician John Luetchford preparing the brand new Fitzroy River mooring for installation</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span>Great Barrier Reef Foundation Managing Director Anna Marsden said, “Our Reef is an irreplaceable ecosystem, but poorer water quality is one of a growing combination of threats to its health.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“Previous monitoring has highlighted that the Fitzroy is a high priority catchment for water quality improvement as it is a major source of excess sediment to local inshore waters which can have a negative impact to the marine life,” Ms Marsden said.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“A healthy Reef needs healthy water, so it’s critical that we’re monitoring water quality in this area. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“Right now, graziers and land managers in the Fitzroy region are helping us to keep 50,000 tonnes of sediment from running off into the Reef’s waters every year, through our $19.6 million regional water quality improvement program. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“By reinstating this monitoring program, we’ll be able to see exactly how our investments into gully control and streambank rehabilitation already underway through our program in the Fitzroy are helping to improve the quality of water in the area and to reach the targets set out by the Reef 2050 Water Quality Improvement Plan.”</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The Fitzroy Basin Program will deliver information to the separate, but complementary <a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/monitoring">Great Barrier Reef Marine Monitoring Program (MMP) – Inshore Water Quality</a>. The MMP – Inshore Water Quality monitors other regions of the inshore Great Barrier Reef and is conducted in partnership between the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, AIMS, James Cook University, and the Cape York Water Monitoring Partnership. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The Fitzroy Basin Marine Monitoring Program for Inshore Water Quality is funded by the partnership between the Australian Government’s Reef Trust and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, and AIMS.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Feature image: </span></span></span><em>AIMS’ RV Cape Ferguson operating in coastal waters surrounding the Keppel Islands, which lie to the north of the Fitzroy River mouth.</em></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5367/edit" hreflang="en">Ferguson in the Keppel Islands</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/copyrightaims_creditmarieroman_fitzroybasinmonitoringprogram-9_800px.jpg" width="800" height="459" alt="white and blue vessel in ocean in front of green island" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Fri, 12 Feb 2021 04:12:25 +0000 kate 3808 at https://www.aims.gov.au Celebrating International Day of Women and Girls in Science https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/celebrating-international-day-women-and-girls-science <h1 class="au-header-heading">Celebrating International Day of Women and Girls in Science</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/38" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">m.knapton</span></span> <span>Thu, 2021-02-11 12:45</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>To celebrate International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we asked five of our scientists about their role at AIMS, and the rewards and challenges of being a woman in science. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Recently, the Australian Institute of Marine Science was recognised for our efforts in gender equity and diversity in the workplace with the internationally recognised <a href="https://www.sciencegenderequity.org.au/athena-swan-bronze-awardees/">Athena SWAN Institutional Bronze Award</a>. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The honour is evidence of AIMS’ commitment to advancing the careers of women in the STEMM disciplines of science, technology, engineering, maths and medicine.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/our-people/dr-marji-puotinen"><span><span><span><span><span><span>Dr Marji Puotinen | Spatial – Ecological Data Scientist | Perth</span></span></span></span></span></span></a></h2> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Who are you and what is your role at AIMS?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="4a25664c-e02e-4e6a-bb18-a738a07607f3" class="align-right embedded-entity" data-langcode="en"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/marji_small.jpg" width="300" height="464" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <p><span><span><span><span>I am a ‘spatial – ecological data scientist’ working in the Perth office at AIMS. I am a geographer thrilled to work with loads of marine biologists and ecologists – helping them design field surveys to get maximum value data for the cost and using that data to ‘fill in the gaps’. I also reconstruct past and future spatial and temporal trajectories of tropical cyclone impacts on coral reefs. </span></span>I sometimes teach people of all ages about this by wearing a coral polyp costumes where the audience can help me ‘bleach’ by removing my photosynthetic algae partner (zooxanthellae – included on the costume as coloured fabric that can be ripped off and put back on) and help me ‘recover’ once the water cools off by putting it back. <span><span>I am very excited now to be working as part of the Reef Restoration and Adaptation Program, helping to spatially prioritise conservation of reefs.  </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Why did you become a scientist?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>I come from a family of ‘nerds’! My dad has a PhD and two masters degrees, my mum had two undergraduate degrees, my older sister has a masters degree and my little sister has a PhD.  As a little girl, I used to love climbing trees, exploring fields of wildflowers, riding my bike and asking a million questions about everything – science was a natural place for me to be.  In my third year of university, I went on a study tour of central and South America – I camped for the first time in a tent on the beach, snorkeled on my first coral reef, saw sea turtles lay eggs on a black sand beach and hiked through rainforests that ended by the ocean’s edge.  This awakened a passion to work on coastal and marine ecosystems, which I studied for my masters and then PhD.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>What would you say to young girls and women thinking about a career in science?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Ask yourself what is it that you ‘can’t not do’?  What inspires you, makes you feel alive and engaged and excited to get up in the morning?  If that is science, then don’t let anything stop you!  Ask for help and encouragement and never doubt that you are good enough and that you can do it!</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>How can we encourage girls to get into science?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Show girls that women are in science and haven’t given up their true selves to be there.  Change society so that women don’t disproportionately bear the housework and child rearing duties – so that women don’t have to make a choice between family and a science careers.  Make the academic workplace family friendly so that women with children can attend meetings but still pick their kids up from school.  Promote and reward work-life balance and a rational workload for all.  Celebrate both male and female role models in science, working in all kinds of creative and different ways.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span><span><span><span>What’s the best thing/moment about being a scientist?</span></span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span>I find it immensely satisfying to apply my mind to a problem solving challenge and then to communicate what I find out to people of all ages and backgrounds and to see those findings help make the world a better place.  After all, that is what science is for.  And science has taken me to incredible places like the Great Barrier Reef, the Amazon rainforest, agricultural fields in SE Asia, remote reefs offshore from NW Australia and even Antarctica!!</span></span></p> <h2><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/our-people/dr-renata-ferrari"><span><span><span><span><span><span>Dr Renata Ferrari Legorreta </span><span>| Ecological Risk Modeller | Townsville</span></span></span></span></span></span></a></h2> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Who are you and what is your role at AIMS?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <div alt="3D Mapping" data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="entity_reference:media_thumbnail" data-entity-embed-display-settings="450_x_450" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="104febcd-c47a-4614-8668-e1d4e2ba4120" class="align-right embedded-entity" data-langcode="en"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/450_x_450/public/2021-02/gopr1487-2.jpg?itok=SzI5_R4B" width="450" height="338" alt="3D Mapping" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I am a research scientist in spatial marine ecology at the AIMS, with a focus on</span></span></span></span><span><span><span> understanding and conserving ecosystems into the future<span>. </span>For example, I have developed 3D maps of marine ecosystems to quantify the change in coral reef structure as a result of environmental change impacts. The tools and models I have developed inform management of marine and coastal ecosystems in several countries. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Why did you become a scientist?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Gandhi famously said, “I must be the change I want to see in the world.” I’ve always wanted to see humankind </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>respect nature more than what we actually do. Pursuing a career in conservation biology is the best way I can think of to change the way we see (and respect) nature. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I have always liked the sea, 70% of our planet is marine, and the oceans produce one of every three breaths we take. For some time I thought I wanted to focus on marine mammal science and conservation. Then I realised that you cannot have the birds (or the fish) if you don’t have the forest, and an ecosystem approach seemed better than a species based approach. Of all marine ecosystems, coral reefs are the most diverse, and in my opinion the most beautiful. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>What would you say to young girls and women thinking about a career in science?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>As M. Gandhi famously said “You may never know what results come of your action, but if you do nothing there will be no result." It is not an easy path, conservation science and practice, often filled with frustrations and big challenges, but if your heart is in it and you don’t give up, you will most likely love it. So don’t be afraid and get out there.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>What’s the best thing/moment about being a scientist?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>To see my science outputs applied to solve real world problems. For example when I teach other researchers how to create 3D maps of reefs and they use that tech in their own projects, or when I helped the Solitary Islands Marine Park monitoring team to integrate 3D mapping into their research which helped to revise and improve the marine park zoning after 10 years. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span><span><span><span><span>Dr Laura Stapp | Technical Officer | Darwin</span></span></span></span></span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span><strong><span>What is your role at AIMS?</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="d367f51b-6fd5-4d8f-82be-cd4fc2a58c3c" class="align-right embedded-entity" data-langcode="en"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/laura-stapp.jpg" width="300" height="464" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <p><span><span><span><span>At AIMS, I work as a Technical Officer in the Darwin Team. My role supports the ecotoxicological work that we are doing, which involves running toxicity tests of various compounds and effluents on model organisms in the lab and maintaining our brood stock in the aquarium.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span>Why did you become a scientist?</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Since I was a young girl I was interested in animals and the natural world around me. This curiosity about the natural world did not fade during high school and biology was always the subject I enjoyed most at school. Studying biology was therefore the logical consequence; a decision I never regretted.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span>What would you say to young girls and women thinking about a career in science?</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>I would recommend them to do what they are passionate about while also trying to keep an open mind. I think it is also important to find good mentors and to get as much hands-on experience outside of Uni as possible. Be proactive and don’t give up!</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span>How can we encourage girls to get into science?</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>I think it is important to engage young girls in doing science as early as possible. For example, my dad was a chemistry teacher and would sometimes do small science experiments with us at home. I think this helped to spark my interest in science while also giving me some confidence that I can DO science. So, I think letting girls DO science rather than just talking about it will help them to become more confident in their abilities and will help to overcome gender stereotypes. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span>What’s the best thing/moment about being a scientist?</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>I think the best thing about being a scientist is that you never stop learning. You get to see and work in cool places which you would not be able to in a “normal” job, as well as being able to meet great people from all over the world.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/our-people/dr-karen-miller"><span><span><span><span><span><span>Dr Karen Miller | Marine Ecologist | WA</span></span></span></span></span></span></a></h2> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Who are you and what is your role at AIMS?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="1435d418-8367-453a-ae7e-964bba5ac63b" class="align-right embedded-entity" data-langcode="en"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/karen-miller_small.jpg" width="300" height="464" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <p><span><span><span><span>I am a marine ecologist – I initially started my career studying corals on the Great Barrier Reef and have since worked on corals and other benthic invertebrates as far south as Antarctic and from shallow coral reefs to the deep sea. My role now at AIMS is as the Research Program Director for AIMS in Western Australia.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Why did you become a scientist?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>I always loved animals and the love of the natural environment has been the main driver for my career choices. Why marine? In the end it was a serendipitous opportunity associated with allergies of domestic animals (so vet science was impractical!), enjoying learning to scuba dive and an opportunity to visit the Great Barrier Reef – which just blew me away!</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>What would you say to young girls and women thinking about a career in science?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Follow your passion – don’t feel constrained by what others think you should do or become (if I’d done that, I’d be an accountant running the family business!). If you love what you do, it will never feel like work and going that extra mile to realise an opportunity will be worth it.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>How can we encourage girls to get into science?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>I think being exposed to role models is really important – it shows us that we can do anything if we try – so thanks for the opportunity to provide that for upcoming female marine scientists through this forum!</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>What’s the best thing/moment about being a scientist?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>My role now is more about facilitating science opportunities for others. At the moment one of the most rewarding things for me is being able to help AIMS scientists realise research opportunities that provide knowledge to help us manage and conserve our marine ecosystems.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/our-people/dr-barbara-robson"><span><span><span><span><span><span>Dr Barbara Robson |</span><span><span><span> Biogeochemical Modeller</span></span></span><span> | Townsville </span></span></span></span></span></span></a></h2> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="82432e8c-b6f5-4942-bec4-ef0e1b9665fc" class="align-right embedded-entity" data-langcode="en"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/barbara-robson_small.jpg" width="300" height="464" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Who are you and what is your role at AIMS?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I am a biogeochemical modeller, which means that I use computer simulations to better understand water quality and how it affects marine ecosystems. I use models to predict what will happen to water quality in the Great Barrier Reef if things change – for instance, if we try different management interventions or in different climate change futures.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Why did you become a scientist?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I first decided that I wanted to be a scientist when I was about five years old, watching David Attenborough documentaries. I loved nature and learning more about how ecosystems work. I changed my mind a few times before finishing school, but I am glad that I came back to science. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>What would you say to young girls and women thinking about a career in science?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Science is a great career choice. There are not many other careers that give you so much autonomy, so much opportunity to see the world and make a contribution, or so many bright and interesting people to work with.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>How can we encourage girls to get into science?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Girls do get into science in high numbers. The problem is that young women often leave science early in their careers (this is more true in some fields than others – women are very well represented in marine science). To change this, we need to keep doing more to overcome implicit biases and career hurdles for parents who are primary careers for their children (or who are assumed to be so).</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>What’s the best thing/moment about being a scientist?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I am always learning new things and sometimes help to discover things that nobody knew before.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/barbara_robson.jpg" width="4032" height="3024" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Thu, 11 Feb 2021 01:45:50 +0000 m.knapton 3805 at https://www.aims.gov.au AI to ‘go fish’ https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/ai-go-fish <h1 class="au-header-heading">AI to ‘go fish’</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/38" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">m.knapton</span></span> <span>Mon, 2021-02-08 12:15</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><figure role="group" class="align-center"> <div alt="A baited remote underwater videos station (BRUVS) is lowered into the water by AIMS scientists" data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="0a6ab74b-e7d7-4db5-87ef-4806007ce3a4" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/bruvs.jpg" width="1200" height="723" alt="A baited remote underwater videos station (BRUVS) is lowered into the water by AIMS scientists" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>A baited remote underwater videos station (BRUVS) is lowered into the water by AIMS scientists.<br /> Photo: Matt Birt</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span>Artificial intelligence may soon be counting and classifying Australia’s tropical fish populations if at least one of the four Australian technology businesses to receive Australian Government seed funding is successful.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The four small to medium-sized businesses are sharing funding of almost $400,000 from the latest round of the <a href="https://www.industry.gov.au/funding-and-incentives/business-research-and-innovation-initiative">Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources’ Business Research and Innovation Initiative.</a></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The businesses will use the funding to address a challenge set by the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS).</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>They will each run a project to scope the feasibility of creating an innovative solution to analyse fish video survey data, harnessing advanced technologies such as machine learning and artificial intelligence.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Currently, AIMS uses <a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/docs/research/monitoring/seabed/video-monitoring.html">Baited Remote Underwater Video Stations</a> (BRUVS) to capture footage of fish populations to better understand reef health. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The method can give estimates of the fish species present, their numbers, sizes and biomass which provide critical indicators of the health of the fish community, but it has a drawback.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>This BRUVS footage, which can capture up to 70 different species per video, is manually analysed by an experienced researcher – a labour-intensive and time-consuming task which limits the ability to scale-up data collection.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The challenge is to develop technology that can learn to identify different species, count them, and measure fish length, quickly and efficiently delivering critical information about fish communities, removing the potential for observer bias.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The solution needs to be easy enough for a non-technical user to operate – such as citizen scientists and Indigenous and local communities – which would lead to a significant scaling up of the data collected in Australia and beyond.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>It could also provide opportunities to expand the monitoring other marine life including sharks, rays and sea snakes.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>AIMS Technology Development Engineering Team Leader <a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/our-people/melanie-olsen">Melanie Olsen</a> said it was AIMS’ first BRII Challenge and they were delighted with the strong interest it attracted and the large number of high-quality applications.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The four companies (Tekno (<a href="https://www.gaiaresources.com.au/">GAIA Resources</a>), <a href="http://mapizy.com/index.html">Mapizy</a>, <a href="https://silverpond.com.au/">Silverpond </a>and <a href="https://www.harriergroup.com/">Harrier Project Management</a>) will be competing to produce the most compelling feasibility study. The top two solutions will then each be eligible for a grant of up to $1 million to work with AIMS to develop a prototype.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“We look forward to working closely with these technology innovators to develop a solution that could potentially revolutionise the way diverse fish populations are monitored, not only in Australia, but across the world,” Ms Olsen said.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“This is another example of the way we work with industry to apply new technologies, such as AI, to the problems our ecologists are facing and to expand our capabilities and the services we can deliver to the Australian public.” </span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/bruvs.jpg" width="1200" height="723" alt="A baited remote underwater videos station (BRUVS) is lowered into the water by AIMS scientists" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Mon, 08 Feb 2021 01:15:12 +0000 m.knapton 3803 at https://www.aims.gov.au Future of reef management is in the cloud  https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/future-reef-management-cloud <h1 class="au-header-heading">Future of reef management is in the cloud </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/38" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">m.knapton</span></span> <span>Wed, 2021-02-03 15:08</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>AIMS is harnessing the world-leading expertise of <a href="http://www.accenture.com/">Accenture</a> in a partnership to create a cloud-based machine learning platform that will connect data from disparate sources to help the world better manage coral reefs which are under increasing threat. </p> <p>The system draws upon the best expertise, data, and technologies, to provide an accessible, integrated approach to coral reef monitoring.  </p> <p>AIMS project leader, senior research scientist Dr Manuel Gonzalez Rivero said Accenture brought the expertise to help AIMS realise its vision of creating a system that allowed users in disparate locations, using different technologies, to share data to collaborate and generate knowledge and timely advice for reef management.  </p> <p>Accenture’s R&amp;D centre, <a href="https://www.accenture.com/ie-en/services/about/innovation-hub-the-dock">The Dock</a>, has successfully completed a phase of initial testing. </p> <p><a href="https://newsroom.accenture.com/news/australian-institute-of-marine-science-and-accenture-join-forces-to-advance-coral-reef-monitoring-and-conservation.htm">Accenture announced this partnership today</a>. Further details will be available this year. </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5344/edit" hreflang="en">Diver on transect tape</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2021-02/copyrightaims_creditltmp_2_lr.jpg" width="2432" height="1824" alt="Diver on transect tape on healthy reef" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Wed, 03 Feb 2021 04:08:08 +0000 m.knapton 3800 at https://www.aims.gov.au Sea Science and Storylines https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/sea-science-and-storylines <h1 class="au-header-heading">Sea Science and Storylines</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Fri, 2021-01-29 13:14</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span>The Australian Institute of Marine Science recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples as the Traditional Owners of the land a<span>nd</span> sea country in which we work, and Australia’s first scientists and custodians of country.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Building <a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/indigenous-partnerships">partnerships with Traditional Owners of sea country in Northern Australia</a>, we are weaving traditional knowledge with western science to create better ways of understanding tropical marine environments for a sustainable future. These collaborations are based on trust, respect, and two-way<s><span>s</span></s> knowledge sharing, and are integral to our <a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/about/aims-strategy-2025">AIMS Strategy 2025</a>.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>AIMS scientists came together with Traditional Owners to share the challenges and opportunities in establishing Indigenous marine research partnerships on sea country. The webinar discussion, 'Sea Science and Storylines: the journey so far with the Australian Institute of Marine Science, was hosted by <span>Duane Fraser, </span>GBRMPA Board member and Wulgurukaba and Bidjara Traditional Owner<span> and included the following panelists:</span></span></span></p> <ul> <li>Chrissy Grant, cultural and natural resource management expert and Kuku Yalanji elder</li> <li>Dr Paul Hardisty, AIMS CEO</li> <li>Libby Evans‑Illidge, Team Leader of AIMS Indigenous Partnerships</li> <li>Manuwuri Forester, AIMS Indigenous Partnerships Coordinator and Lama Lama and Nywaigi Traditional Owner</li> <li>Bob Muir, AIMS Indigenous Partnerships Coordinator and Woppaburra elder, and</li> <li>Dr Jim Underwood, AIMS scientist</li> </ul> <p><span><span><span>The panel </span>explored how <span>an </span>approach grounded in truth telling and two-way learning delivers mutual benefits for Traditional Owners and communities and an enhanced scientific understanding of northern Australia’s unique marine environment.</span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong>WATCH</strong> <a href="https://youtu.be/qaDDuKhkG8A">Sea Science and Storylines on our YouTube channel </a></span></span></p> <p> </p> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="3e27cfdd-232d-4124-98cc-7c2ce10bc663" class="align-center embedded-entity" data-langcode="en"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-oembed-video field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item"> <iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/qaDDuKhkG8A&amp;max_width=560&amp;max_height=315&amp;hash=r0Q7Tur5PLNHrmCT5i_RD4yjd9SG15egfR5Yz1DRceg" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="560" height="315" class="media-oembed-content" title="Sea Science and Storylines: the journey so far with the Australian Institute of Marine Science"></iframe></div> </article> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2019-12/dsc_0093_1050px.jpg" width="1200" height="798" alt="AIMS scientists with Traditional Owner with reef shapes" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Fri, 29 Jan 2021 02:14:19 +0000 kate 3798 at https://www.aims.gov.au Satellite tracking finds turtle foraging areas in north-west https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/satellite-tracking-finds-turtle-foraging-areas-north-west <h1 class="au-header-heading">Satellite tracking finds turtle foraging areas in north-west</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-12-08 13:25</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span>Marine scientists have mapped previously unknown foraging grounds and migratory routes of Western Australia’s green turtles to support conservation of the iconic threatened species.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>The Australian Institute of Marine Science-led study also examined where turtles spent time during the nesting season which <span lang="EN-GB" xml:lang="EN-GB" xml:lang="EN-GB">will allow researchers to </span>identify the area’s most important to them and to <span lang="EN-GB" xml:lang="EN-GB" xml:lang="EN-GB">determine where </span>this overlaps with industrial activity.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>The project saw researchers tag 20 female green turtles nesting at WA beaches and track them with satellites.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>They then combined their data with that from a further 76 turtles tagged in previous studies.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>AIMS marine ecologist Dr Luciana Ferreira said the ultimate goal in mapping the green turtle distribution was to provide the knowledge to help reduce the species’ potential interactions with human activities in the resource rich areas of Australia’s north-west.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“Existing spatial protections underestimate the foraging distribution of green turtles and are missing some important areas. It’s really essential for the turtles’ protection if we know where they go and what they do,” Dr Ferreira said.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>The study shows while green turtles use existing protected areas during the nesting season, they then migrate to previously unmapped foraging grounds where they spend most of their time.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>This information on the turtles’ movement patterns will help scientists, industry and environmental managers protect the species in areas that are important to Australia’s economic development. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>Most turtles foraged within Australian coastal waters, with only two per cent of the tagged green turtles crossing international boundaries.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“We had one turtle that swam to foraging areas in Indonesia,” she said. “And two turtles tagged in WA travelled all the way to the Torres Strait.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“One turtle in the study travelled more than 3000 kilometres from her nesting area.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“Interestingly, 14 per cent remained in their nesting areas—instead of migrating away they just stayed there.”</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Despite the differences in where the turtles migrated to at the end of the nesting season, the team found two common migratory corridors for green turtles, one in the Pilbara and one in the Kimberley.</span></span></p> <figure role="group" class="align-center"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="c67d17d6-51c7-4302-9a57-65d77953c5e4" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-12/tagged_turtle_1050px.jpg" width="1200" height="893" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <figcaption>A green turtle returns to the sea after being tagged with a satellite transmitter in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Credit: Luciana Ferreira</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span>AIMS ecologist <a data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="add5d0ee-5c7d-4a14-a123-4c3f7b72f4ca" href="/node/3539">Dr Michele Thums</a> said collaboration was crucial to the success of the project.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“Satellite tracking is expensive and tracking only a few turtles would not have provided an accurate distribution map,” she said.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“Instead, working with industry and turtle scientists in WA we were able to compile data from almost 100 tracked turtles for our analysis.”</span></span></p> <p><span><span>The research drew on studies from the WA Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA), INPEX, Woodside Energy and Pendoley Environmental.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>DBCA research scientist Dr Sabrina Fossette said turtles hold cultural, spiritual and economic importance for Indigenous Australians and the results are also of enormous interest to them.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“Turtles feature in many stories, ceremonies, traditions and contemporary activities of Indigenous people,” she said.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Dr Fossette said the research will help inform the management of green turtles, which are listed as endangered by the International Union of Conservation of Nature (IUCN).</span></span></p> <p><span><span>“We have a good idea of where green turtles nest in Western Australia but until now we didn’t know a lot about where they go when they leave those areas,” she said.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>This study was conducted as part of AIMS’ North West Shoals to Shore Research Program and was supported by Santos as part of the company’s commitment to better understand Western Australia’s marine environment.</span></span></p> <p>The paper, <span><span><em><a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ddi.13197">Multiple satellite tracking datasets inform green turtle conservation at a regional scale</a> </em>(Ferreira et al 2020) was published in the journal, Diversity and Distributions.</span></span></p> <p><span><span>Feature image: A green turtle on a Western Australian beach. Credit: Kellie Pendoley</span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-12/Media%20release%20-%20Green%20turtle%20tracking%20supports%20conservation%20-%20Dec%2020.pdf"><span><span>Download | 583KB</span></span></a></p> <p><strong><span><span>Media Contact</span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span>Mr John Liston, AIMS Communication Manager: </span></span><span><span><a href="mailto:j.liston@aims.gov.au">j.liston@aims.gov.au</a>. Mob. +61 407 102 684 (UTC +8)</span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/2" hreflang="en">Latest releases</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>Media Release</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5316/edit" hreflang="en">Green turtle_Credit Kellie Pendoley</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-12/old_girl_green_south_end_1200px.jpg" width="1200" height="800" alt="A green turtle resting on a beach" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Tue, 08 Dec 2020 02:25:42 +0000 kate 3784 at https://www.aims.gov.au ABC to live-broadcast AIMS coral spawning research https://www.aims.gov.au/news-and-media/abc-live-broadcast-aims-coral-spawning-research <h1 class="au-header-heading">ABC to live-broadcast AIMS coral spawning research </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/5" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kate</span></span> <span>Wed, 2020-12-02 16:43</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>The <a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/seasim">AIMS National Sea Simulator</a> (SeaSim) will this week feature in a two-part live ABC television broadcast capturing the wonder of coral spawning on the Great Barrier Reef.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>As one of four broadcast locations for REEF LIVE, SeaSim, the world’s most sophisticated marine research aquarium, will open its doors, offering Australians the rare opportunity to witness coral spawning in real time. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Happening only a few nights a year on the Great Barrier Reef, between October and December when the moon is full, coral spawning is a spectacular natural phenomenon where coral sperm and eggs float to the surface of the ocean, fertilise and develop into larvae. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Coral spawning is the key reproductive event that replenishes coral reefs and provides a narrow opportunity for AIMS researchers to collect samples of coral larvae to study the reproductive biology.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>This year, more than 40 million coral larvae are expected to be collected for research in SeaSim.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>These will come from 389 coral colonies from 27 different species collected from nine different reefs from north of Lizard Island to the Keppels in the south. Many will be returned to their reefs after spawning.</span></span></span></p> <figure role="group" class="align-center"> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="2bc0b8de-6766-4aeb-a01c-cd30530cbdd9" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-oembed-video field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item"> <iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/EJ1cCcfVyOc&amp;max_width=560&amp;max_height=315&amp;hash=B8cISQcJvhmpSim07Lzo1RoG_jyR7NKTTjX4zodbBnE" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="560" height="315" class="media-oembed-content" title="AIMS Spawnathon 2019 - coral spawning research in the National Sea Simulator"></iframe></div> </article> </div> <figcaption>Re-live last year's coral spawning excitement in the National Sea Simulator</figcaption> </figure> <p><span><span><span>In addition to these recently collected corals there are also spawning colonies, of various species, that have lived in SeaSim over the past four years, including second-generation colonies and hybrid corals, which SeaSim staff and AIMS researchers are expecting to spawn this year as well.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>On the evenings of Friday December 4 and Sunday December 6, ABC presenter Dr Ann Jones will introduce viewers to the AIMS scientists leading the world in developing tools and approaches to enhancing <a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/reef-recovery">coral reef recovery, adaptation and restoration</a>.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Much of this research will underpin the <a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/research/reef-recovery/RRAP">Reef Restoration and Adaptation Program (RRAP)</a>, the world’s largest collaborative effort to help the Great Barrier Reef resist, adapt to and recover from the impacts of climate change.</span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><a href="https://www.aims.gov.au/research/spawning-research-2020">Find out more about what is happening in SeaSim for reef spawning in 2020</a></span></span></span></h4> <p> </p> <div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.embed" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="3dfe01b5-e776-456d-9c21-bfe23be93b68" class="align-center embedded-entity" data-langcode="en"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-oembed-video field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item"> <iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/xEZqD4QO_b0&amp;max_width=560&amp;max_height=315&amp;hash=rdH1xh1xPOrUNUgzYCIwZZlKJKeDZwKPtFmIEiSy7Do" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="560" height="315" class="media-oembed-content" title="Reef Live | Official Trailer"></iframe></div> </article> </div> <p class="text-align-center"><a href="https://iview.abc.net.au/show/reef-live">Learn more about REEF LIVE </a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">Latest news</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-release-type field--type-list-string field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Media Release Type</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li>News</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Featured image</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/5307/edit" hreflang="en">Reef live daisy coral banner</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-thumbnail field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2020-11/3_reeflive_mediaportal_658x640.jpg" width="658" height="460" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> Wed, 02 Dec 2020 05:43:49 +0000 kate 3778 at https://www.aims.gov.au