Supervisors

AIMS

Dr Richard Brinkman
Senior Research Scientist

r.brinkman@aims.gov.au
(07) 4753 4374

Richard is the Lead Physical Oceanographer for the Australian Institute of Marine Science where he leads and implements research projects within the broad topics of coastal oceanography and physical-biological interactions on continental shelves. Richard currently undertakes research on shelf dynamics, coupling of shelf and ocean circulation, sediment dynamics on tropical coasts, wave propagation over coral reefs and physical-biological interactions at regional and local scales, using a mix of field observations and numerical modelling.

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

1. Oceanography of North-West Australia
2. Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia

Richard Brinkman

Dr Tim Cooper


Research Scientist  t.cooper@aims.gov.au 
(08) 6369 4081

Tim is interested in understanding the consequences of climate change on coral reefs. His primary research focus is on investigating the trajectories of historical coral growth rates derived from paleo-records in skeletal material obtained from long-lived, massive corals on coral reefs in Western Australia. He is interested in genetic and physiological process description of corals under threat from global climate change impacts and the development of eco-physiological spatial models of mesophotic coral communities as environmental management tools.

He is especially interested in developing AIMS-UWA-CSIRO project:

4.  Climate change in marine environments

Dr Martial Depczynski
Research Scientistm.depczynski@aims.gov.au
(08) 6369 4025

Martial is a fish ecologist interested in physiological responses to climate change, life history theory, the role of fishes in ecosystem function and connectivity at the within reefscape scale.

He is especially interested in developing AIMS-UWA- CSIRO projects:

2. Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
4. Climate change in marine environments

Dr Miles J Furnas
Senior Research Scientistm.furnas@aims.gov.au
(07) 4753 4323  

Miles is a biological oceanographer specializing in phytoplankton ecology, pelagic productivity and nutrient cycling in shelf and oceanic ecosystems.  His interests include the growth and productivity of marine phytoplankton, the ecology and nutrient dynamics of pelagic N-fixing bacteria, upwelling ecosystems, constructing nutrient budgets and ocean colour remote sensing.  

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO project:

1. Oceanography of North-West Australia

Dr James Gilmour
Research Scientist
j.gilmour@aims.gov.au

(08) 6369 4055

(

http://data.aims.gov.au/staffcv/)

James is a benthic ecologist specialising in coral communities. His research focuses on the resilience of coral communities to different disturbance regimes and his interest include: methods of monitoring coral communities; reproduction, larval ecology and dispersal of corals; sexual and asexual selection in clonal organisms; and combining demographic data in simple population models.

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO project:

6. Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

Dr Andrew Heyward
Principal Research Scientista.heyward@aims.gov.au
(08) 6369 4038

Andrew is interested in the ecology and population dynamics of reef-building corals and reef communities from fringing reefs to shelf-edge reed and banks in NW Australia. Specific interests include coral reproduction, reef restoration, and the development of tools to assess and monitor reefs which are inaccessible to diving. 

He is especially interested in developing AIMS-UWA- CSIRO projects:

4. Climate change in marine environments
5. Ecology of Submerged Banks and Shoals off NW Australia
6. Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

Dr Ross Jones
Principal Research Scientistr.jones@aims.gov.au
(08) 6469 4015

Ross is a coral biologist interested in the response of the coral-algal symbiosis to changes in environmental conditions (natural and anthropogenic).

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

4. Climate change in marine environments
6. Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

Ross Jones
Dr Janice Lough
SeniorPrincipal Research Scientistj.lough@aims.gov.au
(07) 4753 4248

(

http://data.aims.gov.au/staffcv/)

Janice is a climate scientist with two primary areas of research focus. First, understanding the nature, causes and impacts of current (and possible future) rapid climate change on tropical coral reef ecosystems, primarily though analyses of instrumental climate records. Second, developing historical perspectives on current rapid changes and their impacts though development and interpretation of coral growth and paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental histories from long-lived massive corals. She is particularly interested in comparing and contrasting climate and environmental changes and impacts in Australia's western and eastern tropical marine ecosystems a

nd developing AIMS-UWA- CSIRO project:

4. Climate change in marine environments

Dr David McKinnon
Principal Research Scientistd.mckinnon@aims.gov.au 
(07) 4753 4292

David is a zooplankton ecologist and biological oceanographer specializing in the biological oceanography of Australia's tropical seas and the environmental impacts of tropical aquaculture. His research interests include the interaction of physical oceanography with pelagic biological processes, zooplankton dynamics, planktonic food chains and the microbial loop.

He is especially interested in developing AIMS-UWA - CSIRO projects:

2. Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
3. Developing effective conservation strategies for vulnerable, threatened, endangered and protected marine species

Dave McKinnon
Dr Mark Meekan
Principal Research Scientistm.meekan@aims.gov.au
(08) 6369 4039

Mark Meekan is a fish biologist with a focus on coral reef ecosystems and the processes influencing early life history traits, connectivity, demography and the role of apex predators in structuring reef systems.

He is especially interested in developing AIMS-UWA- CSIRO projects:

2. Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
3. Developing effective conservation strategies for vulnerable, threatened, endangered and protected marine species
4. Climate change in marine environments

Dr Andrew Negri
Senior Research Scientist    a.negri@aims.gov.au  
(07) 4753 4322

Andrew is an ecotoxicologist examining the effects of pollution (dredging, agricultural, shipping) and climate change (temperature and acidification) on corals and other reef organisms including algae, sponges and fish.  He is also interested in coral spawning, reproduction and recruitment and

developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

4. Climate change in marine environments
6.  Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

Dr Ben Radford
Research Scientist
b.radford@aims.gov.au

(08) 6369 4037

Ben is a GIS /Spatial Modeller his research focus is on the use of spatial models to predict patterns of biodiversity based upon an understanding of biophysical surrogates and/or ecological processes.

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO project:

5. Ecology of Submerged Banks and Shoals off NW Australia

Dr Christine Schönberg
Research Scientistc.schoenberg@aims.gov.au
(08) 6369 4042

Christine is a benthic ecologist working on sponges. Her expertise is bioeroding sponges, and for many years she investigated how environmental changes may influence sponge bioerosion and how that may interact with coral reef health. While she mainly worked on the Great Barrier Reef before, she recently moved to WA and broadened her approaches to include free-living sponges. New studies will look into carbon and nutrient cycling.

She is especially interested in developing AIMS-UWA- CSIRO projects:

4. Climate change in marine environments
6. Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

CSIRO
Dr Russ Babcock
Senior Principal Research Scientistruss.babcock@csiro.au
(07) 3826 7184

Russ is a marine ecologist with broad interests in both tropical and temperate coastal ecosystem processes. Current interests focus on understanding ecosystem responses to human interventions as coastal development, fishing and climate change. Projects include studies of trophic cascades and influences on predation, grazing, competition and recruitment at Ningaloo Marine Park. The role of fishes in these interactions and connectivity among habitats (especially in the context of marine park adequacy) is also a core area of interest through acoustic tagging and tracking In subtropical WA kelp/coral patch dynamics and the temperate tropical transition are also strong areas of interest.

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

2. Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
3. Developing effective conservation strategies for vulnerable, threatened, endangered and protected marine species
4. Climate change in marine environments
6. Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

Dr John Keesing 
john.keesing@csiro.au

(08) 93336500

Dr Keesing leads the Sustainable Coastal Environment research portfolio area in CSIRO's Wealth from Oceans Flagship. He is interested in physical, biogeochemical and ecological interactions in coastal and shelf environments and how these maybe influenced by human impacts. Current interests include the role of grazers in mediating sediment biogeochemistry and soft sediment habitat trophodynamics. His recent research has also included examining the role that intensive uses of coastal ecosystems play in facilitating ecological disturbances such as macroalgal and jellyfish blooms.

He is especially interested in developing AIMS-UWA- CSIRO projects:

2.  Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
4.  Climate change in marine environments
5.  Ecology of Submerged Banks and Shoals off NW Australia
6.  Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

Dr Graham Symonds
Principal Research Scientistgraham.symonds@csiro.au
(08) 93336571

Graham is a physical oceanographer with interests in nearshore processes on beaches and reefs. Using both field based studies and modelling he has studied the coupling between waves, currents, sediment transport and bathymetry, most recently in developing a littoral zone forecasting capability. He has also studied wave driven flows on and around reefs with recent field and modelling studies on temperate reefs off Perth and coral reefs at Ningaloo. His reef studies have also led to examining the impacts of waves and currents on benthic habitats and wave driven flow through canopies.

2 Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
6 Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

Dr Mat Vanderklift
Research Scientist    mat.vanderklift@csiro.au  
(08) 9333 6536

Mat is a marine ecologist whose research primarily focuses on nearshore benthic ecosystems. His research encompasses tropical and temperate ecosystems, and work on food webs is a central theme. Major projects have included investigations of the origin and fate of benthic primary production, the responses of ecosystems to fishing and habitat loss, and the processes that connect habitats.

2.  Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
4.  Climate change in marine environments

University of Western Australia

Bryan J Boruff

ph 6488 2700

bryan.boruff@uwa.edu.au

Bryan is a Geographer with expertise in the application of Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing technologies to environmental management issues. His work to date has focused on the methodological development of risk and vulnerability assessments for environmental hazards however, in general, Bryan is interested in research addressing environmental management issues from a social ecological perspective.

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

3. Developing effective conservation strategies for vulnerable, threatened, endangered and protected marine species
4. Climate change in marine environments

Bryan J Boruff
Michael Burton

Ph 6488 2531

michael.burton@uwa.edu.au

Michael is an environmental and resource economist who is works in the area of measuring peoples values for marine environments, and how they make tradeoffs across protecting different types of environmental assets.  This research then links with ideas of how one can most effectively develop conservation strategies,

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

3. Developing effective conservation strategies for vulnerable, threatened, endangered and protected marine species

Peta Clode

ph 6488 8098
peta.clode@uwa.edu.au

Peta is a marine biologist, who is interested in biomineralisation processes of marine organisms, physiology of coral-algal symbioses, larval physiology, zooxanthellate vs azooxanthellate corals, and structure-function relationships in cells and tissues. Her expertise is centred around her position in the Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis and includes optical and electron microscopy, 3D imaging, and analytical microscopy techniques.

Peta Clode
Shaun P. Collin

ph: 08 6488 2632
shaun.collin@uwa.edu.au

Shaun is a marine neurobiologist with specific interests in the neural bases of behaviour (of aquatic animals). Using a multidisciplinary approach (anatomy, electrophysiology, molecular biology, behaviour and ecology), he is interested in how the sensory systems (vision, olfaction, electroreception, mechanoreception and gustation) of lampreys, hagfishes, sharks and rays, teleosts  and marine mammals detect and react to environmental factors in nature.  He is particularly interested in the integration of sensory ecology and fisheries, aquaculture, marine ecology and bioimaging and sees his contribution to a joint AIMS-UWA-CSIRO project 3. Developing effective conservation strategies for vulnerable, threatened and protected marine species

Shaun P. Collin
Carlos Duarte

Ph 6488 8116
oceans@uwa.edu.au

Professor Carlos Duarte trained in limnology and his current research focuses on understanding he impacts of global change in aquatic ecosystems, both marine and freshwater. His research involves two nodes of separate but complementary interests, one on the metabolic and elemental budgets of aquatic ecosystems and their connectivity in space, and the other on the stability and dynamics of aquatic habitats and the maintenance of biodiversity, including demographics, space occupation and gene flow. This research, at the interface between biogeochemistry and community ecology, is conducted in continental aquatic ecosystems and marine ecosystems alike, thereby bridging limnology and oceanography. Currently his research emphasises gaps in our understanding of carbon and metabolic budgets in aquatic ecosystems, nonlinear processes and thresholds in community responses to pressures, gen flow in population networks and the rold of science as a prospective platform to anticipate and generate the knowledge for society's future challenges. His research is thus poised at the interface between ocean and sustainability science.

Euan S Harvey

ph 64882416  euanh@cyllene.uwa.edu.au

Euan Harvey is a fish ecologist whose research interests encompass fisheries and marine conservation. He is particularly interested in the impacts of fishing and climate change on marine ecosystems and fish assemblages, the biogeography of marine fishes and how demersal fish assemblage structure is influenced by the fine and broad scale physical and biotic structure of benthic habitats.  

Euan S Harvey

Matt Hipsey

ph 64883186

matt.hipsey@uwa.edu.au

I have a cross-disciplinary background and broad research interest in aquatic sciences with a focus on coupled phyiscal-biogeochemical modelling of rivers, lakes, estuaries and coastal seas for the purpose of characterising habitat dynamics and unravelling controls on nutrient flux pathways and water quality processes in aquatic systems. My research group conducts process studies that strategically combine hydrodynamics, microbial trophic interactions and aquatic biogeochemistry with a range of state-of-the-art modelling approaches. This approach is being used to quantify ecosystem-scale processes and their variability, and how these important environmental systems respond to environmental change. 

Greg Ivey

ph 6488 3528
Greg.Ivey@uwa.edu.au

Greg is interested in integrating field observations, numerical modelling and laboratory experiments in order to quantify the mechanisms responsible for transport and mixing in the coastal ocean. His interests include small scale mixing, internal waves, convective mixing, upwelling, hydrodynamics over coral reefs, tidal flows in complex topography and the effects of cyclonic forcing, with particular focus on the Australia North West Shelf and the Kimberleys. 

Greg Ivey
Nicole L. Jones

ph 6488 3074
nicole.jones@uwa.edu.au

Nicole's research focus is environmental fluid mechanics, in particular the interaction between physical and biological systems in natural aquatic environments. She uses a combination of laboratory and field observations as well as numerical modelling to study topics such as: estuarine dynamics, the transfer of momentum to the ocean surface from wind-waves, turbulence in density stratified fluids, internal wave dynamics, flow around complex topography,  plume dispersion and benthic-pelagic coupling (see www.sese.uwa.edu.au/~jonesn) Due to the inter-disciplinary nature of Nicole's research her background is particularly relevant to the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO project

1 Oceanography of North-West Australia
2. Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
6. Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

Nicole L. Jones

Gary Kendrick

ph 6488 3998
gary.kendrick@uwa.edu.au

Gary's

research focuses on the interrelationship between abiotic and biotic processes in the marine environment, and their impact on the patterns of distribution and abundance of communities and populations of organisms. Kendrick has focused this research on two model systems: marine benthic seaweed, and seagrass ecosystems. His research has included the study of seagrass and seaweed ecophysiology, nutrient dynamics, dispersal, recruitment, growth and reproduction, trophodynamics and grazing. landscape ecology, spatial modelling and mapping.

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

2 Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
4. Climate change in marine environments
5 Ecology of Submerged Banks and Shoals off NW Australia
6. Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

Gary Kendrick

Jason Kennington

ph 6488 3233

Jason.kennington@uwa.edu.au

Jason is a population geneticist with interests in gene flow, local adaptation and evolutionary responses to fishing and climate change.

He is especially interested in developing AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

2. Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
4. Climate change in marine environments

Jason Kennington
Ryan Lowe

ph: 64882706
Ryan.Lowe@uwa.edu.au

Ryan's research involves the study of how oceanic and atmospheric forcing drives the circulation and distribution of wave energy within a broad range of coastal systems (e.g., on coral reefs, beaches, rocky shorelines, and in estuaries) – see http://www.uwa.edu.au/people/ryan.lowe. In most cases, this work is motivated by the need to improve our understanding of the coupling between hydrodynamics and other key processes occurring in coastal environments, such as sediment transport, biogeochemical cycling and spatial ecology. He is interested in developing an AIMS-UWA-CSIRO project

1 Oceanography of North-West Australia
2. Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
4. Climate change in marine environments

Ryan Lowe
Malcolm T McCulloch

ph:64881921
Malcolm.McCulloch@uwa.edu.au

Malcolm is a quantitative marine geochemist specialising in obtaining long-term coral records to assess how climate and environmental change is impacting coral reef systems. His interests include the effects of rising CO2 on coral calcification and seawater pH, assessing the effects of enhanced sediment input from anthropogenic disturbance of river catchments on reef systems, and using isotopic and trace element geochemical tools to understand the inter-relationship and connectivity across major marine habitats.

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA_CSIRO project

4. Climate change in marine environments.

Nicola Mitchell

ph 6488 4510    

nicola.mitchell@uwa.edu.au 

Nicki  is a physiological ecologist working on marine turtles. Her focus is on developing models for predicting how hatchling sex varies spatially and temporary, with a view to understanding how behaviours and distributions will alter under climate change. Her expertise is in mechanistic modeling, developmental physiology and climate change adaptation and policy. She is currently working on projects on flatback and loggerhead turtles in WA.

She is especially interested in developing AIMS-UWA- CSIRO projects:

3.  Developing effective conservation strategies for vulnerable, threatened, endangered and protected marine species
4.  Climate change in marine environments

Nicola Mitchell
David Pannell

ph 6488 4735


david.pannell@uwa.edu.au

David is an environmental economist whose research focuses on how the community can identify and obtain the most valuable environmental outcomes for the available resources. He is interested in developing projects on the economics of various marine conservation measures; the optimal design of marine policies and projects; evaluation of existing marine policies; adoption of conservation practices by marine resource users; and integrated assessment of marine projects.

He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

3. Developing effective conservation strategies for vulnerable, threatened and protected marine species

David Pannell
Chari Pattiaratchi

ph:6488 3179
chari.pattiaratchi@uwa.edu.au

Chari is a coastal physical oceanographer with an emphasis on field experiments and numerical modelling. His interests include circulation and mixing processes on the continental shelf regions of Western Australia; dynamics of island wakes and headland eddies; estuarine dynamics and sediment transport; and, nearshore processes. He has a particular interest on ocean observation systems and data acquisition using ocean gliders. He is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA project:

1.Oceanography of North-West Australia

Chari Pattiaratchi

Jane Prince


ph 6488 1469
jane.prince@uwa.edu.au

Jane is community ecologist interested in the processes driving community structure within intertidal communities on rock platforms and sand flats and within sub-tidal infaunal communities. Her work in the NW includes the detection of human impacts on sandy beaches and the description of infaunal communities adjacent to oil and gas installations.

She is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects ;

2. Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia
5. Ecology of Submerged Banks and Shoals off NW Australia
6. Impacts of Dredging on Coastal Ecosystems

Jane Prince
Kimberly Van Neil
ph 6488 2707
kimberly.vanniel@uwa.edu.au

I work in spatial ecology and biogeography, so I study where species occur and how spatial patterns of different habitats affect the distribution of plants and animals by providing resources that affect survival. Survival depends on their specific requirements and the presence of suitable habitats, in part defining how they are distributed. I combine modelling with field and lab experimental data to better understand how species are dealing with environmental stressors and how they may be impacted by landscape impacts such as climate change. Understanding the environmental drivers of species distribution is a key focus of my research.

She is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

2. Ecology and connectivity of shallow water systems in NW Australia

Kimberly Van Neil
Anya Waite

ph 6488 3082


anya.waite@uwa.edu.au

Anya Waite is a biological oceanographer whose multidisciplinary interests range from particle dynamics to food-web mapping, and from the impact of climate on primary production to fisheries oceanography. Her approach is generally focused on the interaction between ecology and biogeochemistry, and how this is driven by physical processes and linked to climate. Off WA, she has executed numerous field programs at sea elucidating the impact of mesoscale eddies on production and planktonic food web structure. Other interests include the interaction of Ningaloo reef with the surrounding oceanography.

She is especially interested in developing the AIMS-UWA-CSIRO projects:

3. Developing effective conservation strategies for vulnerable, threatened and protected marine species

Anya Waite